EU Commissioner explains the new CAP to the wine industry

Monday July 05 2021 by Vitisphere

 For de-alcoholisation and labelling, “at this stage, it is a political agreement. The detailed provisions for the application of this agreement will be decided later by the Commission”, warns Janusz Wojciechowski. For de-alcoholisation and labelling, “at this stage, it is a political agreement. The detailed provisions for the application of this agreement will be decided later by the Commission”, warns Janusz Wojciechowski. - Photo credit : European Commission
The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP 2023-2027) got the political green light at end of June. It has many implications for the wine industry, outlined below by the European Commissioner for Agriculture, Janusz Wojciechowski.

Negotiations for the new CAP seem to have been particularly complex. How would you describe its implications for European farming in general, and the wine industry in particular?  

Janusz Wojciechowski: I welcome the outcome of the CAP reform negotiations, after three years of discussions with the Council and the European Parliament. It was crucial to conclude these negotiations quickly, so that the new CAP can be implemented on 1 January 2023. Basically, the new CAP will allow farmers to face the major challenges of the coming years, particularly the ecological transition detailed in the European Green Deal and progress towards economically, environmentally and socially sustainable agri-food systems.

For the wine industry, the results are very positive and echo the challenges for the industry in the coming years: sustainability and consumer demand for greater transparency. In particular, I would like to point out the new-found possibility of using hybrid vines for protected designations of origin (PDOs); incorporation of de-alcoholised wines into the CAP; progress for PDOs and protected geographical indications (PGIs) and the introduction of nutritional labelling and lists of ingredients.

 

How do you view the compromise on the extension of planting authorisations from 2030 to 2045?

The extension of the planting authorisation regime to 2045 is perhaps the least positive aspect of the CAP agreement for the wine industry. The Commission considers that this system (which is unique to the wine sector) is not justified. The industry already has sufficient tools to control production. Its effect as a curb on industry growth, especially in terms of innovation and development, is more worrying.

 

Will hybrid resistant grape varieties be authorised for PDOs?

Yes, on a voluntary basis for Member States and PDO management bodies.

 

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