‘Prosecco from Provence’ aims to help move rosé upmarket

Thursday May 28 2020 by Vitisphere

 Available in white (90% Rolle and 10% Viognier) and rosé (60% Grenache and 40% Cinsault), the Les Impatients range has a recommended retail price of 14 euros. Available in white (90% Rolle and 10% Viognier) and rosé (60% Grenache and 40% Cinsault), the Les Impatients range has a recommended retail price of 14 euros.

Domaine de Fontenille is proud to present Les Impatients, the first Prosecco from Provence, 2019 vintage”, stated a press release from the Luberon estate, which boasts 40 hectares of bearing vineyards. The estate has launched the sparkling wine with no geographical indication, recognising “we have no right to call it this legally, we know that. The aim is to conjure up an atmosphere and a spirit”, explains Joan Poillet, sales manager for Fontenille estates, a hotel group with five establishments in locations such as Hossegor, Marseilles and Minorca.

The production run is small, at just 2,500 bottles of white and the same amount of rosé, and the sparkling label is as much about drawing on Italian inspiration as diversifying production in a region where sparkling wines are few and far between. The Les Impatients range, which is designed as an aperitif and for cocktails, will supply Fontenille hotels and restaurants as well as other stockists in France and abroad.

For Joan Poillet, the aim of the range extension is to strengthen the brand and improve price points, particularly for rosé wines. “Over the past 10 to 15 years, Provence rosé has been increasingly exported and promoted. Although consumer perception has evolved, few consumers are aware that there are age-worthy rosés. Rosé is still an occasion-driven wine. The best way to enhance the value of rosé is to associate it with other labels”, he comments.

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Jc Viens 29 may 2020 - 20:33:34
This article should be removed immediately. This wine has absolutely nothing to do with Prosecco which is a protected designation. The blatant misappropriation of their success is a vulgar marketing trick not worthy of serious journalism. It make Vitisphere look seriously unprofessional.
Subhash Arora 30 may 2020 - 08:07:47
Very surprised you don't call it GI but yet a Prosecco! Knowing that you will be sued by them soon and will have to change the name. But in advertising they say, bad publicity is also good advertising. No a justified way of differentiating your product but hell you got me reading about it in India. Both France and Italy are members of EU!! I wonder how your appellation would react if I wanted to make a Provence Rose or an Italian producer decided to call their Rose wine as Provence Rose!! Good luck with your project. Very Myopic. I would give you 3 months to establish yourselves. I wonder if you would be asked to pay penalty too!!
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