Château Montrose goes green and champions biodiversity

Thursday March 14 2019 by Vitisphere

Hervé Berland, manager of Montrose (left), and Vincent Decup, director of winery research and development.Hervé Berland, manager of Montrose (left), and Vincent Decup, director of winery research and development. - Photo credit : Montrose

The list is almost endless: a photovoltaic farm (1,700 panels covering 3,000 square metres of roof); geothermal equipment; an independent waste water treatment plant; gradual conversion to organic farming (15% of vineyard area in 2016, 100% in 2020); soil biomass (500 tonnes of composted vine and cellar waste); reintroduction of grazing with 30 ewes and a ram; massal and clonal selection; transition of technical facilities to 100% electric; and recovery of CO2 from the winemaking process. Basically, every aspect of Château Montrose is going green. “We are guided by two main lines of research: to limit the impact of our business on the environment as much as possible and to make the work of our employees easier”, explains Hervé Berland who manages the property that has been under Bouygues family ownership since 2006. The Château devotes 1.5% of its annual turnover to research and development, equating to 150,000 euros per year.

Bio-economy with the CO2 from fermentation

The winery houses a process for recovering CO2 from alcoholic fermentation.  “We are aiming for 15 tonnes this year, equivalent to 40% recycling of CO2”, says Vincent Decup, director of winery research and development. These products still have to be reused. The first level is internal: “We developed a detergent from sodium bicarbonate for our tanks and barrels”, he explains. At external level, sodium bicarbonate could supply the toothpaste industry and spirulina markets (Ed: sodium bicarbonate alkalinises their culture medium). 

 

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