Vineyard planting rights: set at 1% in Europe from 2016 to 2030

Wednesday June 26 2013 by Vitisphere

After two years of studies, negotiations and (most of all) lobbying, European wine industry just let out a sigh of relief: planting vines will remain governed by planting rights system. "This is a victory for field and land people against ideologues" sums up Jean-Paul Bachy (President of the Assembly of European Wine Regions). After the failure of negotiations on June 6, the final discussions on the Common Agricultural Policy represented the ultimate window in order to end on a compromise. The position of the European Ministers of Agriculture on June 25 helped moving from status quo. The Council of Ministers complied with European Parliament main request: the implementation of the new system until 2030. The upper limit for new plantations authorization was set at 1%, the balance established by the Council of Ministers. From this ceiling, each Member State will set its own planting rate.

The begining of this licensing system will take place January 1, 2016. Which was an undebattable condition for the European Commission. Standing today, the last trialogue (reuniting European Commission, Council of Ministers and European Parliament) led to this compromise. President of the French Confederation of Producers of Wine and Spirits of Controlled Origin (CNAOC), Pascal Bobillier Monnot is having a hard time realizing that the planting rights saga is now over. He is now hoping that "professional managers will take the time to think on the fight which was conducted us to victory. Only unity allowed us to gain this decision. This joint work will be necessary soon, in order to prevent the opening of a reform of the EU wine market."

The abolition of the current system of planting rights was decided in 2008, on the proposal of Commissioner for Agriculture Mariann Fischer Boel.

 

[Illustration: European Union]

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