Italy ranks as the world’s most competitive country

Jeudi 29 novembre 2018 par Vitisphere

 Audrey Laurent, wine researcher at FranceAgriMer (left) and Julie Barat, head of the specialised sectors unit at FranceAgriMer (right), presented the research on competitiveness on 21 November at Vinitech. Audrey Laurent, wine researcher at FranceAgriMer (left) and Julie Barat, head of the specialised sectors unit at FranceAgriMer (right), presented the research on competitiveness on 21 November at Vinitech.

Thirteen wine producing countries were studied using 70 indicators divided into six different themes by Deloitte on behalf of FranceAgriMer to produce an overview of competition in the world wine market in 2017. Basing its research on 2016 statistics, the firm presented its 20th macroeconomic analysis. Although the methodology of the 2017 version has changed, the ranking is virtually the same, placing Italy in first place with a total of 659 points, closely followed by France which is rated at 653. The top three is completed by Spain, which garnered 602 points and thus returns to the top after falling to 5th place in 2016. The three European countries, and world's leading producers, are challenged by three Southern Hemisphere countries: Australia, Chile and the United States (third, fourth and fifth respectively). For the rest of the ranking, FranceAgriMer highlights two countries: China, which has one of the largest vineyards in the world, and Germany, which has moved up three places compared to the 2016 ranking.

Italy continues to lead the way

The Italian Peninsula holds on to its leadership position, particularly due to the productivity of its vineyards  - it is the world's leading producer, especially of Prosecco -  the breadth of its range (in terms of product categories, packaging, services, etc.) and the adaptation of product profiles to suit demand. Also, its sales are bolstered by a significant export market share - accounting for 40% of the country’s output - as well as an upswing in domestic consumption. Finally, marketing and packaging adaptation are considered dynamic and FranceAgriMer also points to Italy’s competitive pricing. The study does though detail some weak points, namely Italy's dependence on three main markets (the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom), its low sales margins and the size of its SMEs, that are too small to perform in certain export markets.

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