Wines with a flor

Mardi 13 février 2018 par Vitisphere

There are similarities between Spanish (Jerez and Manzanilla), French (mainly in Jura...), Hungarian (Tokay) and Italian wines (particularly in Sardinia).
There are similarities between Spanish (Jerez and Manzanilla), French (mainly in Jura...), Hungarian (Tokay) and Italian wines (particularly in Sardinia). - crédit photo : Philippe Bruniaux

Wines with a veil of flor yeast are the opposite to wines that are topped up during ageing”, summed up oenologist Jocelyn Broncard, head of the Jura departmental analysis laboratory. Speaking at the first international symposium dedicated to wines with a veil of yeast, the expert outlined the similarities between Spanish (Jerez and Manzanilla), French (mainly in Jura...), Hungarian (Tokay) and Italian wines (particularly Sardinia).

Unlike traditional maturation where the evaporation of the wine through the barrel is counterbalanced by the regular addition of wine, reduction is keenly sought after to allow the development of a film of yeast - the veil. “The yeast occurring in the wine rises to the surface and spreads, protecting the wine from oxidation and acetic bacteria," explained Jocelyn Broncard, who points out that the specific characteristics of the Savagnin grape allow Vin Jaune to mature for six years and three months. The grape variety offers enough acidity and alcohol content to withstand the ultimate test.

The oversight theory...

Production of the Jura wine region’s iconic Vin Jaune could be explained by “the theory whereby a cask of white wine was forgotten and not topped up, leaving the contents to reduce and the veil of yeast to form," explained Jocelyn Broncard. But the oenologist reported that there is another theory: the Spaniards may have brought their technique to Franche Comté when the area was part of the Habsburg territories during the Renaissance.

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